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FYI

Prism Prize Video: Madeleine Roger - Cottonwood

The 2019 Prism Prize for Best Canadian Music Video was awarded to Kevan Funk, for his clip for Belle Game’s Low. We will continue to profile prominent Canadian videos, including this one from an acclaimed folk singer-songwriter from Winnipeg.

Prism Prize Video: Madeleine Roger - Cottonwood

By External Source

The 2019 Prism Prize for Best Canadian Music Video was awarded to Kevan Funk, for his clip for Belle Game’s Low. We will continue to profile prominent Canadian videos, including this one from an acclaimed folk singer-songwriter from Winnipeg.


Madeleine Roger - Cottonwood

For folk singer Madeleine Roger, being in tune with nature has always been a common theme. Her inspiration for the songs was discovering that her friends embarking on having their first child.  She wrote the song to focus on 'growing up' from the perspective of trees, sharing some of the advice that each tree might give to their offspring through the years. 

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For the video, Roger and director Joel Penner offer up a visual treat exploring nature’s natural beauty with a juxtaposing approach of using timelapse photography. It captures nature at it’s finest - seeds emerging from pods, seedlings sprouting from the ground, flowers wilting and drying and re-blooming - perfectly representing all moments in the journey of life and celebrating the very moment that inspired Roger to write the song.

Directed by: Joel Penner

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The cast of "Stereophonic"
Julieta Cervantes

The cast of "Stereophonic"

Pop

Will Butler on Writing the Tony-Nominated Music for ‘Stereophonic’: ‘It Was Like a Thousand-Piece Puzzle With 200 Pieces Missing’

The former Arcade Fire member has two nominations for his stunning songs, written for a fictional (but very believable) rock band onstage.

Will Butler’s first meeting with playwright David Adjmi was fairly open-ended: a friend had told Butler that Adjmi — a fan of Arcade Fire, the band Butler was in at the time — was working on a play about a band and that Butler could “write the music or just consult or whatever.”

But from their first sit-down at a diner near New York’s theatre district, Adjmi’s vision was “instantly recognizable” to Butler: “Like, oh, it’s a demo — it’s like a transcendental thing that they can never recapture. You have things falling apart because the headphones sound bad, you have people yelling at each other over music but it’s because of how their dad treated them,” he recalls with a laugh.

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