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SamaritanMag Spotlights George Thorogood's Philanthropy

George Thorogood doesn’t call donating money to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society “charity.” He calls it “a tragedy.”

SamaritanMag Spotlights George Thorogood's Philanthropy

By Karen Bliss

George Thorogood doesn’t call donating money to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society “charity.” He calls it “a tragedy.” 


The American boogie blues legend, whose albums have sold more than 15 million copies worldwide over four decades, watched his father-in-law's successful fight with leukemia, a blood disease (he is now in remission).

On his Canadian and U.S. tours, he has been directing a dollar per ticket sold and 100 percent of net proceeds from a specially designed t-shirt to the two organizations whose aim is to  “cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families.”

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In the U.S. the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society is the largest funder of cutting-edge research to advance cures and has invested more than $1.2 billion (USD) in research. In Canada, in 2017, alone, the LLS spent almost $7.4 million (CAD) — 4.1 million in innovative research and $3.3 million towards patient services and education — a 37 percent increase over 2016

While Thorogood would likely prefer to talk about his latest album, Party of One — at 68-years-old, his first-ever solo album (without his backing group The Destroyers) — he took time out while on tour to have a discussion with Samaritanmag about giving back, as well as what he remembers from performing at Bob Geldof and Midge Ure’s dual-city famine relief concert Live Aid in the 80s.

It’s simple to add a dollar to your ticket price and direct it to a charity. Have you done that before?

– Continue reading George Thorogood on the Tragedy of Leukemia, Donating, and Live Aid on the SamaritanMag website

 

 

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Celine Dion
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Celine Dion

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Celine Dion Battled Extreme Muscle Spasms From Stiff-Person Syndrome With Dangerously High Doses of Valium: ‘It Could Have Been Fatal’

The singer opened up about her decade-long struggle with the rare neurological disorder in Tuesday night's (June 11) primetime NBC special.

Celine Dion was so desperate to alleviate the pain from severe muscle spasms during her secret, nearly two-decade-long battle with the rare neurological and autoimmune disease Stiff-Person Syndrome that she took near-lethal doses of Valium in search of relief. In her one-hour primetime NBC special on Tuesday night (June 11), Dion said she took up to 90 milligrams of the medication used to treat anxiety, seizures and muscle spasms, an amount that is more than twice the recommended daily dose.

“I did not know, honestly, that it could kill me. I would take, for example before a performance, 20 milligrams of Valium, and then just walking from my dressing room to backstage — it was gone,” Dion said of the instant pain relief the medication offered at levels, however that “could have been fatal” if she’d continued at that pace. “At one point, the thing is, that my body got used to it at 20 and 30 and 40 [milligrams] until it went up. And I needed that. It was relaxing my whole body. For two weeks, for a month, the show would go on… but then you get used to [and] it doesn’t work anymore.”

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