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FYI

A Podcast Conversation With ... Kristine King

I get these random calls from FYI Music News editor-and-chief David Farrell often when he's walking the sandbanks of P.E.I., blissed out on sunshine and ocean spray, saying, “Why don't you

A Podcast Conversation With ... Kristine King

By Bill King

I get these random calls from FYI Music News editor-and-chief David Farrell often when he's walking the sandbanks of P.E.I., blissed out on sunshine and ocean spray, saying, “Why don't you call Joey Cee? He's got an interesting story. Why not Steve Coady? He's just retired.” Then the capper, “How about the little lady of the house, Kristine?”


David knows Kristine well. This is no little lady in prudential terms. This is my outspoken New York-born spouse. I'm thinking. David, seriously? Do you want me to go there? My first thought? Make this all about Kristine. There's a long music history there. A wall of friends from North America and throughout the Caribbean. Kristine built that wall through deep friendships, kindness, being a warrior for justice, and one big badass smile.

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She often gets mistaken for her spouse, the piano-playing photographer who writes and talks. Yet, truth be, she has long roots in the Canadian music industry, with stints at Manta Sound, Sounds Interchange, CRIA under Brian Chater, CHUM-FM, Scott Richards, Warner Chappell Music, her own music promotion company—Artist Radio Promotion, and Music Media Network. Currently – Ejazznews on Facebook.

Then came art classes, Three Schools, and Central Tech Adult Art Program. Then four writing courses, magazine and design and production, and photography courses at Ryerson.
The experience was instrumental in Kristine's work for the Jazz Report Magazine, Jazz Report Awards and National Jazz Awards.

Justice! I will share this story: We biked through High Park in 1972 and came side by side with two black gentlemen. Up ahead, a couple, one with what looked like a trumpet case. As we pass, the fake bugler demands to know why we are biking with ….(racist language). We continued, and the four of us looked at each other in astonishment, then smiled. Talk as this was rampant in certain circles in Toronto. Then, a kilometre ahead, the guy again appears with his women, blocks the path, and screams obscenities.

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Kristine dismounts and insists the guy apologizes. He then turns on her. I suggest, Do not mess with the Long Island Sound Off. My bride lays into the guy with both fists. The shock of feeling the smack of a two-fisted New Yorker and loss of hair sent the guy running. The two brothers took over from there. Case closed.

I think you will find this conversation engaging. It's all about the dedicated women who worked at the reception desks and back offices. The pride of radio. The women who smiled, grabbed a coffee and made life pleasant for those suited-up men stressed over ratings.

This is where we begin today with this week’s FYI Music News.ca Podcast -  Kristine King.

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Shaq’s Classic Song ‘You Can’t Stop the Reign’ Featuring Biggie Is Finally on Streaming Services
Rb Hip Hop

Shaq’s Classic Song ‘You Can’t Stop the Reign’ Featuring Biggie Is Finally on Streaming Services

There's a more explicit Biggie verse in the vault, according to the NBA legend.

Shaq’s classic with Biggie is finally available on streaming services. The news was broken by FakeShoreDrive on X earlier this week, and the Hall of Fame big man confirmed the news Thursday afternoon (June 13).

The year is 1996 and Shaquille O’Neal and the Notorious B.I.G. are two of the biggest figures in their respective fields. Shaq was entering the last year of his deal with the Orlando Magic before he headed west to the Los Angeles Lakers at the end of the 1995-1996 season. Biggie was getting ready to release his sophomore album, Life After Death, while in the throws of a beef with 2Pac. Big name-dropped the NBA player on the song “Gimme the Loot” off his debut album, Ready to Die, and the two had a mutual respect for each other ever since.

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