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FYI

Lyne Tremblay Honours Cohen In 'Dance To the End of Love'

Four years ago, “The Godfather of Gloom", Leonard Cohen left us on Nov. 7th. Accomplished Montreal-based artist Lyne Tremblay honours the bard with this video-song version of the Cohen composition Dance Me to the End of Love from her upcoming indie CD Get to It to be released on Feb. 12.

Lyne Tremblay Honours Cohen In  'Dance To the End of Love'

By FYI Staff

Four years ago, “The Godfather of Gloom", Leonard Cohen left us on Nov. 7th. Accomplished Montreal-based artist Lyne Tremblay honours the bard with this video-song version of the Cohen composition Dance Me to the End of Love from her upcoming indie CD Get to It that is set to be released on Feb. 12.


The nine-song project was recorded and produced in Montreal by Matt Zimbel (Manteca) and Erik West Millette (West Trainz) and mixed in Toronto by Jeff Wolpert.

After winning accolades for her first release, Break ‘n Enterin 2004 and acknowledgements in the National Jazz Awards, Tremblay took a different musical approach on the new recordings and created a style described as 'roots-cabaret-redux' in a blend of original compositions in English, French and Spanish and a fresh interpretation on seminal songs such as Grace Jones' Slave to the Rhythm,  Cohen’s Dance Me to the End of Love, David Gilmour's ode to gratitude This Heaven, and the Rolling Stones' Valium anthem Mother’s Little Helper.

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This video was shot near Montauk, New York and in the streets of Manhattan. "I worked on a film with Leonard when I was first starting out," Tremblay explains, adding "and I so wish I could play him this video today."

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FYI

Fixing The News Business Means Learning To Think Differently (Guest Column)

Change is coming quickly to the news industry, and innovation has to come just as quickly.

This is the second part of a series of guest columnsseeking answers to the financial issues that have plagued Canadian news organizations.

My prescription for change is very clear. Stop trying to solve today's problems through yesterday's lens.

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