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FYI

FACTOR Support For Music Industry Totalled $25.2M In Past Year

FACTOR, otherwise known as the Foundation to Assist Canadian Talent On Recordings, took in revenue of $30,880,783 and paid out $25,238,117, according to figures cited in the not-for-profit’s 2019-2

FACTOR Support For Music Industry Totalled $25.2M In Past Year

By FYI Staff

FACTOR, otherwise known as the Foundation to Assist Canadian Talent On Recordings, took in revenue of $30,880,783 and paid out $25,238,117, according to figures cited in the not-for-profit’s 2019-2020 annual report that was released online earlier this week.


Funding from Canadian Heritage totaled $14,546,708 with a further $16,334,075 contributed by Canada’s private radio broadcasters.

Of the money paid out, $514,997 went to regional affiliates and $25,238,117 was paid out in grants.

In total, 2,000 applications requesting close to $44 million were logged over 10 programs offered by FACTOR, the report states.

Support for Canadian-owned music companies came in at just over $6.2M, tour support approvals came in at just under $3M, $950K was spent on 475 of 1,2241 Artist Development submissions, and $755,280.78 went to 53 of 73 requests for video assistance.

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Further specifics along with messages from Chair Meghan Symsyk and President Duncan McKie can be found online on the FACTOR portal.

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Shaq’s Classic Song ‘You Can’t Stop the Reign’ Featuring Biggie Is Finally on Streaming Services
Rb Hip Hop

Shaq’s Classic Song ‘You Can’t Stop the Reign’ Featuring Biggie Is Finally on Streaming Services

There's a more explicit Biggie verse in the vault, according to the NBA legend.

Shaq’s classic with Biggie is finally available on streaming services. The news was broken by FakeShoreDrive on X earlier this week, and the Hall of Fame big man confirmed the news Thursday afternoon (June 13).

The year is 1996 and Shaquille O’Neal and the Notorious B.I.G. are two of the biggest figures in their respective fields. Shaq was entering the last year of his deal with the Orlando Magic before he headed west to the Los Angeles Lakers at the end of the 1995-1996 season. Biggie was getting ready to release his sophomore album, Life After Death, while in the throws of a beef with 2Pac. Big name-dropped the NBA player on the song “Gimme the Loot” off his debut album, Ready to Die, and the two had a mutual respect for each other ever since.

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