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FYI

2022 Prism Prize Eligible Video: The Dirty Nil - Damage Control 

The 2021 Prism Prize for Best Canadian Music Video was recently awarded to Theo Kapodistrias, for his clip for Haviah Mighty’s Thirteen. We will continue to profile noteworthy Canadian videos that are eligible for the 2022 prize, including this one from a Hamilton-based hard rock band.

2022 Prism Prize Eligible Video: The Dirty Nil - Damage Control 

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The 2021 Prism Prize for Best Canadian Music Video was recently awarded to Theo Kapodistrias, for his clip for Haviah Mighty’s Thirteen. We will continue to profile noteworthy Canadian videos that are eligible for the 2022 prize, including this one from a Hamilton-based hard rock band.


The Dirty Nil - Damage Control 

The Dirty Nil is a Hamilton-based rock group that has continued to fascinate listeners whether it be on the stage or through a set of headphones. The group isn’t afraid to move between genres, taking influence from classic rock to pop punk, elevating their songs and style. Many say that the band’s most essential quality is it’s refusal to be defined. 

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Damage Control is featured on the group’s album Fuck Art. The lyrics focus on the internal struggles and emotions that come as we navigate life and all of its obstacles. The intention of the song, as explained by the group, is: “We all want to run damage control when things aren’t going our way, but the reality of the situation is different in the minds of each person involved”. 

Directed and animated by Greg Doble, the video for Damage Control follows the band as they see their futures through the crystal ball of a wacky wizard. Each member faces a different fate from burning down studios to flooding in the recording booth, being toyed with at the Wizard’s own pleasure. Greg Doble explained his intentions for the video this way: “For the music video, I wanted to break down those two pieces of the song along with very literal lines: There is the peril that each band member experiences, but on the other hand, we keep being pulled back out of a dream state and left wondering if any of this is real”. The combination of captivating visuals and meaningful lyrics keeps viewers' attention on The Dirty Nil. 

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Directed by Greg Doble 

Animated by Greg Doble 

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