advertisement
FYI

Voting Open For Slaight Family Polaris Heritage Prize

This prestigious prize is the Polaris version of a hall of fame which seeks to honour meritorious Canadian albums that pre-date when Polaris began in 2006. You can vote for your favourite candidate until Oct. 14.

Voting Open For Slaight Family Polaris Heritage Prize

By FYI Staff

Along with the naming of Pierre Kwenders as the winner of the 2022 Polaris Music Prize last week came the announcement of the candidates for the 2022 Slaight Family Polaris Heritage Prize has opened, with an Oct. 14 (8 pm ET / 5 pm PT) deadline. As with its companion award, the Polaris Music Prize, winners and nominees for the Heritage Prize are also Canadian albums of artistic distinction, without regard to sales, genre or affiliation. This is the Polaris version of a hall of fame which seeks to honour meritorious Canadian albums that pre-date when Polaris began in 2006. 


advertisement

An 11-person group of Canadian music media and historians gather together each year to create a vote-curated list of 12 Short List-nominated albums from which one album is chosen as a winner via a public vote. Separately, a second album is also chosen by the Heritage Prize jury. Both winning albums will be revealed on Oct. 21. 

This year there are 12 nominated albums up for consideration: 

Lillian Allen
Revolutionary Tea Party

Bran Van 3000
Glee

Leonard Cohen
Various Positions

Four The Moment
We’re Still Standing

k.d. lang
Ingenue

Kardinal Offishall
Quest for Fire: Firestarter, Vol 1

Martha and the Muffins
This is the Ice Age

Wayne McGhie & The Sounds of Joy
Wayne McGhie & The Sounds of Joy

Rascalz
Cash Crop

SNFU
...And No One Else Wanted To Play

Stars
Set Yourself on Fire

The Weakerthans
Left and Leaving

This year’s Heritage list features six returning nominated albums (Revolutionary Tea Party, Glee, Ingénue, This is the Ice Age, Set Yourself on Fire, and Left and Leaving) and six first-time album nominations (Various Positions, We’re Still Standing, Quest for Fire: Firestarter, Vol 1, Wayne McGhie & The Sounds of Joy, Cash Crop and ...And No One Else Wanted To Play). 

Go HERE to vote.  Voters can submit ballots once per day. 

advertisement

Heritage Prize winners are commemorated with limited-edition artwork commissioned and inspired by the music on these designated albums. Examples of past winners’ works can be found HERE.

advertisement
The Billboard Canada FYI Bulletin: Projections are Up for the Music Industry, but Stress Marks Are Starting to Show (Column)
Photo by Jordon Conner on Unsplash
FYI

The Billboard Canada FYI Bulletin: Projections are Up for the Music Industry, but Stress Marks Are Starting to Show (Column)

In my Last Pogo at Canadian Music Week, and the last one for its retiring founder Neill Dixon, I saw multiple signs of transition that could define the festival and the industry moving forward.

One of the most memorable speakers from the early Canadian Music Week (CMW) days was in 2008 when Nicholas Negroponte, the founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab, gave a keynote address that some found laughable, others downright scary. The nut of his message was that bits and bytes would transform the music industry’s future, that the CD was passé, that all entertainment would become customizable, and new delivery systems would change how music was heard by audiences globally.

His words were prophetic. Within a year of his speech, companies like Deezer and Spotify let the horse out of the barn by launching their online music streaming services and this shifted control of content away from the major labels. The algorithm was born and nothing’s been the same since.

keep readingShow less
advertisement