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FYI

Music Biz Headlines, Aug. 19, 2019

RALPH ( pictured) is on a roll, a look at Frank Dukes' project with RPSM, and country radio ignores female artists. Also in the headlines are Ghettosocks, SaskMusic, Woodstock, YouTube, Led Zeppelin, hippies, Jay-Z, Jimi Hendrix, John Coltrane, Sleater-Kinney, and Jack White.

Music Biz Headlines, Aug. 19, 2019

By Kerry Doole

 RALPH is going to change the world

It’s been a big week for RALPH. Earlier this week, the Canadian singer released her newest single “No Muss No Fuss,” which is the second track off her forthcoming EP. The same day, she released a video for the track and announced that she’d be joining Carly Rae Jepsen for the Canadian leg of Jepsen’s Dedicated World Tour. –  Ryan Killian Krause, lofficielusa.com


Frank Dukes collaborates with students from Toronto’s Regent Park School of Music to create 11-track compilation called Parkscapes

Attached to the global pop hit Con Altura wth a songwriting credit (and co-producer recognition) is Canada’s Frank Dukes, a Grammy-winning producer-composer who is likely a mystery to many. To get to know him, though, is to better understand how pop music is being made and consumed today. – Brad Wheeler, Globe and Mail

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Listen To This: DK and Ghettosocks deliver golden-age hip hop vibes with "Reflections"

A reworked jazz drum sample—paired with Ghettosocks' legendary wordplay—will make you feel like you traded your arms for wings.–  Morgan MullinThe Coast

The man inside the music: Kaelen Klypak helps local musicians get their feet off the ground

When local artists need help getting exposure or advice they turn to Kaelen Klypak, SaskMusic's project manager for Saskatoon, who has become a jack-of-all-trades in the local music industry, helping artists with all aspects of professional development so they can expand their reach into larger markets.–  Erin Petrow,Star Phoenix

Women on country radio are an endangered species, new research says

Ottawaprofessor Jada Watson's recent study, titled Gender Representation on Country Format Radio, proves what many of the top women in country have been saying for years: Country radio stations play way more songs by male artists than female. Songs by women on country radio declined by 66% between 2000 and 2018. –  Deana Sumanac-Johnson, CBC News ·

Sizzling summer country round-up

A look at Canadian country acts that are making moves.  – Roman Mitz/Open Spaces,  Music Express

A victim of Calgary’s flat economy, drum store owner seeks home for $100,000 vintage collection

Bob Everett wants to find a home for his priceless collection of vintage drums. Last month, Everett made the painful decision to close shop, citing Calgary’s faltering economy. He could attempt to sell off his collection piece by piece online, but would rather see it preserved for posterity at Calgary’s National Music Centre. He estimates it is worth $100,000. – Eric Volmers, Calgary Herald

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International

A 38-disc set lets you feel like you’re at Woodstock

For the first time, an audio recording is available of nearly everything heard on stage at Woodstock 50 years ago — from transcendent music to announcements about lost people and bad acid. It’s the entire Woodstock experience, minus the mud. List price: $799.98 (US). –  David Bauder, AP

YouTube tweaks copyright policy: Rights holders can't monetize videos with short or unintentional music uses

YouTube is tweaking its copyright policy, blocking rights holders from manually monetizing “creator videos with very short or unintentional uses of music.” In a blog post, YouTube announced the change, which will go into effect in mid-September, won’t affect copyright claims filed through content ID, which handles 98% of all claims filed on YouTube, according to the company. – Micah Singleton, Billboard

Are Hippies the new Goths?

Why the dark side of ’60s counterculture is trending now. –  Ruth La Ferla, NY Times

Justice Department sides with Led Zeppelin in ‘Stairway to Heaven’ legal battle

The Trump administration finds the judge ruled correctly in terms of application of pre-1972 copyright law. The copyright dispute is with the estate of late Spirit guitarist Randy (California) Wolfe. – Daniel Kreps, Rolling Stone

Where is Jay-Z taking the NFL?

Anyone keen on the matter understood the deal for what it really was: a well-calculated smokescreen. Even if the NFL means well, it's hard to not see the joint venture as a ploy to purify its image and silence critics who believe what Kaepernick symbolizes. –  Jason Parham, Wired

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Live Review: 46th Umbria Jazz Festival

Umbria announced that in 2019 the total proceeds of 1,600,000 euros and the total estimated turnout of 500,000 were records. There were other impressive numbers: 300 events, 12 venues, 95 bands, and almost 500 musicians. Thomas Conrad, Jazz Times

From Nashville to Woodstock: Exploring Jimi Hendrix's history in Nashville

Many don't know that Hendrix spent time honing his craft in Middle Tennessee. He enlisted in the Army and trained as a paratrooper in the 101st Airborne Division. That brought him to Clarksville, but he was soon discharged, which led to him to Nashville to pursue music. –  Jesse Knutson, News Channel 5

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Sir Bob Geldof v Mick Fleetwood: Music royalty coming to Auckland 

The pair will take part in a Duco Events-organised fundraiser for the charity Play It Strange.– NZ Herald

Progress vs. preservation: Music Row Vision Plan sparks debate

Changes could be coming to one of Nashville’s most famous and iconic locations-- Music Row. City planners have laid out a proposal that would improve intersections, sidewalks and parks. It would also keep physical changes of certain properties to a minimum. The goal is to preserve the neighborhood character and history. – Justin McFarland FOX 17 News.

Trump card: Kiwi music producer Sebastian Kereti takes on president over copyright

NZ music producer loudnz's track used as Donald Trump’s walk out music without permission. – Dubby Henry, New Zealand Herald

A lost album from John Coltrane is found, thanks to a  French-Canadian director

Blue World was recorded at Van Gelder Studios on June 24, 1964 as the soundtrack to a Canadian art film, Le chat dans le sac (The Cat in the Bag) — a coolly stylized, politically charged docufiction by Gilles Groulx, considered a landmark of Québec cinema. – Nate Chinen, NPR

Sleater-Kinney asked St. Vincent for a creative spark. The trio blew up.

After two and a half decades, the acclaimed band ventures into a different sound on its ninth album, The Center Won’t Hold — and moves onward without its longtime drummer.  – Melena Ryzik,  NY Times

Jack White attends baseball game, plays concert, then returns to the tied game

Jack White is, among many things, a big fan our national pastime.  White once again proved his commitment to the sport last night in Washington D.C., where he stopped by the Nationals-Brewers game before his Raconteurs show at The Anthem. Leaving the game after just three innings to play his set, he somehow returned to his seat once the show was over to catch the 14th-inning stretch.– Spin

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Jade Eagleson
Ryan Nolan

Jade Eagleson

Country

Canadian Country Music Association Awards 2024 Nominations: Jade Eagleson, Mackenzie Porter Lead The Pack

The two platinum-selling singer/songwriters have scored six nominations each for the CCMA Awards, with The Reklaws and Josh Ross hot on their heels. The biggest night in Canadian country takes place on Sept. 14 at Rogers Place in Edmonton.

Today (July 18), the Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) announced the official nominees for the 2024 CCMA Awards. Topping the list of contenders with six nods apiece are Jade Eagleson and MacKenzie Porter, the latter of whom will co-host the awards show alongside American country star Thomas Rhett.

Hot on their heels with five nominations apiece are The Reklaws and Josh Ross, while High Valley, Owen Riegling and Dallas Smith are each cited in four categories. Other notable Canadian artists making the list include Dean Brody, Steven Lee Olsen, James Barker Band, Brett Kissel, Tenille Townes and Lindsay Ell.

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