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Eminem Is This Week's 'Kamikaze' King

American rapper Eminem's 10th studio album scores high points in its first week of release, and a couple of Aussies make a strong impression on the chart as well.

Eminem Is This Week's 'Kamikaze' King

By FYI Staff

Eminem’s surprise Kamikaze release debuts at No. 1 on the Billboard Canadian Albums chart with 46,000 total consumption units, picking up the clean sweep of highest album sales, song downloads and audio-on-demand streams for the week. It is his tenth straight chart-topping album.


His 10th studio album, it has achieved the fourth highest one-week consumption total in 2018, behind only Drake, Keith Urban and Post Malone. Additionally, his song “Lucky You” debuts at No. 1 on the Streaming Songs chart. Eminem’s catalogue also shows uplifts with six other releases in the top 200 consumption chart, including Curtain Call 22-18 (+18%) and his last chart-topper, Revival, 69-36 (+46%).

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The remainder of the top five held their positions, with Drake’s Scorpion, at No. 2, Travis Scott’s Astroworld, at 3, Ariana Grande’s Sweetener, at 4 and Post Malone’s Beerbongs & Bentleys, at 5.

Four other new releases debut in the top 40, including Aussie singer Troye Sivan’s Bloom, at No. 13; American boy band Why Don’t We’s 8 Letters, at 15; Aussie singer and multi-instrumentalist Tash Sultana’s Flow State, at 22; and Passenger’s Runaway, at 33.

Maroon 5’s “Girls Like You” spends its ninth week at the top of the Digital Songs chart, the group’s longest-running No. 1 song to date. It surpasses 2011’s “Moves Like Jagger,” which spent eight weeks at No. 1.

– All data courtesy of SoundScan with additional colour commentary provided by Nielsen Music Canada Director, Paul Tuch

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