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FYI

Drake Makes US Chart History...Again

Drake has made US chart history by becoming the first artist to land 29 weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in the same calendar year.

Drake Makes US Chart History...Again

By FYI Staff

Drake has made US chart history by becoming the first artist to land 29 weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in the same calendar year.


The rapper's “In My Feelings” hit has held supreme for 10 weeks on top of the Billboard Hot 100 countdown, taking his tally for the year - from three number ones - to 29 weeks, breaking a tie with Usher, who scored 28 chart-topping weeks in 2004.

Drake has also become the first soloist - and the second act ever - to spend at least 10 weeks at number one with three tracks – “In My Feelings,” “God's Plan” and 2016 hit “One Dance.” Boyz II Men are the only other act to achieve the feat, Billboard reports.

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The Canadian has now spent a total of 49 weeks at number one on the Hot 100 and is only one more week away from tying Boyz II Men for fourth on the all-time list, headed by Mariah Carey with 79.

Billboard offers an update of the acts to spend the most time at No. 1 in any January-December period (with Drake leading in 29 of the 39 chart weeks so far in 2018).

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Tate McRae
Courtesy Photo
Tate McRae
Concerts

Tate McRae Performs First Hometown Concert at Calgary Stampede: 'I Put Off Doing This Show For So Many Years'

The breakout Canadian star took the stage to an excited audience for renditions of hits like "Greedy" and "You Broke Me First," as well as performing her song "Calgary" in its namesake city.

One of Canada's buzziest stars was just welcomed home with open arms — and screaming fans.

Tate McRae performed her first hometown show on Friday (July 5) during the Calgary Stampede. The L.A.-based musician, who had a major breakthrough year in 2023 with her Canadian Hot 100 No. 1 "Greedy," sang chart hits like "Exes" and "You Broke Me First" for a crowd that knew every word.

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