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FYI

In Search Of Canada's Literary Tom Wolfe

He will not be remembered as a great novelist, but as one of the best American magazine writers yet and there needs to be an equal to his narrative skills here in Canada.

In Search Of Canada's Literary Tom Wolfe

By External Source

I am currently reading a great deal of contemporary Canadian fiction, as I am compiling an anthology. I am struck, as I always have been, by the great sad turgidity of most of it, the focus on the domestic setting, the family, the marriage, the kitchen in the small town, dad’s pickup truck. Mom is dying now and still smoking, dad is still an alcoholic and there is a trauma in the past we never really got over. Nobody lives in a city, unless they are there to write a thesis on something obscure and also dating a guy who has a shack on an island. Nobody works in finance or politics. There are no lawyers or advertising executives in Canada, apparently, nobody with an interesting job. There are no techno clubs or operas or ballets or fetish parties, no arguments about the Middle East or bitcoin. My frustration with the narrow tropes of CanLit is exactly the same as it was when I was an undergrad in the late 1980s and dreamed of overthrowing this boomer-imposed thematic dominance with a generation of urbanites who would write about subways and warfare and all the other things that journalism takes on. Nothing has changed.


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And I realize now that I am rewriting, once again, the argument that Tom Wolfe made at the time, in his essay in Harper’s, Stalking the Billion-Footed Beast. In 1989, that was the manifesto I was longing for. It argued that in the United States, creative writing programs had changed an ambitious literary history into an introverted obsession with the small and the personal. It had become artsy and paltry.

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Drake
Courtesy OVO/Republic Records
Drake
Culture

Drake Celebrates at the Announcement of Toronto's New WNBA Team

The hip hop superstar was on site at today's announcement of the Toronto expansion, joined by former Raptors star Kyle Lowry, and the new franchise owner Larry Tanenbaum, causing some to speculate whether Drake might have a stake in the venture.

It's a big day for basketball fans in Canada, and one superstar super-fan is definitely celebrating.

Drake, global ambassador for the Toronto Raptors, was on site at today (May 23)'s announcement of Toronto's WNBA franchise. Alongside former Raptors star Kyle Lowry and Toronto Raptors President Masai Ujiri, Drake came out to show some love for an exciting new era in Canadian sports.

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