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FYI

Macca's 'Let It Be' Brings Tears To 'Karaoke' Corden's Eyes

James Corden's Karaoke Car Pool segment with Paul McCartney, broadcast by CBS on Friday night, has gone viral and is closing in on 100-million views on Facebook and YouTube. A fascination with all things Beatles remains strong, and their song catalogue seemingly timeless.

Macca's 'Let It Be' Brings Tears To 'Karaoke' Corden's Eyes

By David Farrell

It was 52 years ago when the Beatles performed their final concert, at Candlestick Park in San Francisco on August 29, 1966, and 49 years ago since they made an unannounced live appearance on the rooftop of the Apple building in London, England–a show that became their farewell performance to their fans around the world.


Still, after all these years, Paul McCartney, now 76, can continue to pack arenas and earn untold millions from his songs, and last week he brought popular Late Show host James Corden to tears in an episode of Car Pool Karaoke.

The segment had Corden driving around the Beatles hometown of Liverpool singing a set of songs performed by the world’s best-selling group and written by Sir Macca, including “Blackbird” and “Drive My Car” – but it was “Let It Be” that brought tears to Corden’s eyes as he recalled his grandfather playing the song to him as a child, adding: “If my grandfather were here right now he’d get an absolute kick out of this.”

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While there is no specific count since the show aired Friday, clips from the CBS show on YouTube and Facebook are now close to 100-million views, which just goes to show that the fascination with anything Beatles remains, and their catalogue of songs seemingly timeless.

 

 

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The Billboard Canada FYI Bulletin: Projections are Up for the Music Industry, but Stress Marks Are Starting to Show (Column)
Photo by Jordon Conner on Unsplash
FYI

The Billboard Canada FYI Bulletin: Projections are Up for the Music Industry, but Stress Marks Are Starting to Show (Column)

In my Last Pogo at Canadian Music Week, and the last one for its retiring founder Neill Dixon, I saw multiple signs of transition that could define the festival and the industry moving forward.

One of the most memorable speakers from the early Canadian Music Week (CMW) days was in 2008 when Nicholas Negroponte, the founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab, gave a keynote address that some found laughable, others downright scary. The nut of his message was that bits and bytes would transform the music industry’s future, that the CD was passé, that all entertainment would become customizable, and new delivery systems would change how music was heard by audiences globally.

His words were prophetic. Within a year of his speech, companies like Deezer and Spotify let the horse out of the barn by launching their online music streaming services and this shifted control of content away from the major labels. The algorithm was born and nothing’s been the same since.

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