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Rb Hip Hop

Macklemore Supports College Campus Protests, Rips Biden on Pro-Palestinian Song ‘Hind’s Hall’

All proceeds from the song will go to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency once it hits streaming.

Macklemore performs during The Innings Festival at Tempe Beach Park on February 24, 2024 in Tempe, Arizona.

Macklemore performs during The Innings Festival at Tempe Beach Park on February 24, 2024 in Tempe, Arizona.

John Medina/Getty Images

Macklemore hasn’t been one to mince words in the past when speaking up for a cause he believes in. Now, the Seattle native is throwing his support behind Gaza and college student protests across America on the politically charged song “Hind’s Hall.”

The “Thrift Shop” rapper uploaded the fiery track to social media on Monday evening (May 6), and promised once the song makes it onto streaming services, all proceeds will go toward the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), which offers assistance and protection to Palestinian refugees.


“Hind’s Hall” is the new name student protestors have given to the Columbia University residence Hamilton Hall, in tribute to six-year-old Hind Rajab, who was killed in Gaza.

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The jarring visual accompanying the track shows footage of police getting violent with students protesting at college campuses, as well as deadly explosions taking place in Gaza City.

Macklemore kicks off with a salute to N.W.A and the group’s explicit 1988 anti-police anthem. “When I was seven, I learned a lesson from Cube and Eazy-E/ What was it again? Oh yeah, f–k the police,” he raps.

The Billboard Hot 100-topping artist goes on to call out President Joe Biden and America’s diplomatic support for Israel while revealing he won’t be voting for the incumbent again this fall.

“Where does genocide land in your definition, huh/ Destroyin’ every college in Gaza and every mosque/ Pushin’ everyone into Rafah and droppin’ bombs/ The blood is on your hands, Biden, we can see it all/ And f–k no, I’m not votin’ for you in the fall,” Macklemore declares.

The 40-year-old rapper also challenges those equating anti-Zionism with antisemitism, pointing out that he sees Jewish people standing in solidarity with the Palestinian people as well. “We see the lies in ’em/ Claimin’ it’s antisemitic to be anti-Zionist/ I’ve seen Jewish brothers and sisters out there and ridin’ in/ Solidarity and screamin’ Free Palestine with them,” he raps.

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With the hip-hop world distracted by the Drake and Kendrick Lamar feud, Macklemore wants to shift the focus to ceasefire talks rather than hearing what the 6 God has to say next. “What happened to the artist? What d’you got to say/ If I was on a label, you could drop me today/ I’d be fine with it ’cause the heart fed my page/ I want a ceasefire, f–k a response from Drake/ What you willin’ to risk? What you willin’ to give,” he asks.

More than 2,000 students have been arrested across the country in pro-Palestinian protests, according to The Guardian. More than 100 of those were booked by New York police officers during protests at Columbia University last week.

On Oct. 7, 2023, Hamas terrorists invaded Israel, killing around 1,200 people and taking about 250 hostages, many of whom remain in Gaza, according to The Associated Press. Israel and Hamas have been entrenched in a deadly war since that has decimated Gaza; more than 34,500 Palestinians have been killed, per the AP, and more than 1,700 people in Israel have been killed, per ABC News. Ceasefire talks involving the release of hostages remain ongoing.

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Earlier in 2024, Israel accused 12 UNRWA employees of being part of Hamas and helping coordinate the attacks against them; the organization immediately terminated or suspended the accused individuals, but lost much of its international funding as a result of the claims. Since then, an independent study concluded that no evidence was found connecting the UNRWA to the Oct. 7 attacks, according to NPR. Many nations have resumed funding to UNRWA since then.

Watch Macklemore’s “Hind’s Hall” visual below.

This article was originally published by Billboard U.S.

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