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FYI

Tay Stays On Top As Alanis & Beyoncé Make Strong Debuts

Tay now has a three-week reign at the top with folklore, but (pictured) Alanis and Beyoncé both have strong debuts on the Albums chart this week.

Tay Stays On Top As Alanis & Beyoncé Make Strong Debuts

By FYI Staff

Taylor Swift’s folklore remains at No. 1 on the Billboard Canadian Albums chart with over 23,000 total consumption units, achieving the highest album sales and on-demand streams for the week. It is her fifth chart-topping album to spend multiple weeks on the chart and the first since 2017’s Reputation reigned for three weeks.


Pop Smoke’s Shoot For The Stars Aim For The Moon and Juice WRLD’s Legends Never Die hold their positions from last week, at Nos 2 & 3 respectively. Harry Styles’ Fine Line edges 5-4, with the highest digital song download total for the week, and DaBaby’s Blame it On Baby rebounds 11-5.

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The top new entry of the week belongs to Alanis Morissette’s Such Pretty Forks In The Road at No. 14, scoring the second-highest album sales total for the week. It is her first charted album since 2012’s Havoc And Bright Lights debuted at No. 1.

Diljit Dosanjh’s G.O.A.T. leaps 145-16 in its first full week of release. It is the Indian singer/actor’s highest-charting album to date.

Beyoncé’s The Lion King: The Gift, which debuted at No. 4 in July 2019, re-enters at No. 39, with the release of a deluxe version of the album.

Dominic Fike’s debut full-length album What Could Possibly Go Wrong lands at No. 50. Shoreline Mafia’s Maria Bidness comes in at No. 56, their highest-charting album to date.

- All data courtesy of SoundScan with additional detail provided by MRC Entertainment's Paul Tuch.

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The cast of "Stereophonic"
Julieta Cervantes

The cast of "Stereophonic"

Pop

Will Butler on Writing the Tony-Nominated Music for ‘Stereophonic’: ‘It Was Like a Thousand-Piece Puzzle With 200 Pieces Missing’

The former Arcade Fire member has two nominations for his stunning songs, written for a fictional (but very believable) rock band onstage.

Will Butler’s first meeting with playwright David Adjmi was fairly open-ended: a friend had told Butler that Adjmi — a fan of Arcade Fire, the band Butler was in at the time — was working on a play about a band and that Butler could “write the music or just consult or whatever.”

But from their first sit-down at a diner near New York’s theatre district, Adjmi’s vision was “instantly recognizable” to Butler: “Like, oh, it’s a demo — it’s like a transcendental thing that they can never recapture. You have things falling apart because the headphones sound bad, you have people yelling at each other over music but it’s because of how their dad treated them,” he recalls with a laugh.

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