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FYI

Radio’s Big Challenge Finds An Answer

“Straight up, the biggest threat to radio is myopic leadership. We're in a period of remarkable growth and opportunity, yet so many leaders believe their job is to defend "’radio.’”

Radio’s Big Challenge Finds An Answer

By External Source

When you are out talking to radio people, what advice do you give them about how to build their businesses? What success tips do you offer?


They need to be able to see two things: First, a clear vision for the "new" industry that they would create. That vision involves being part of a bigger business than terrestrial radio. It involves morphing into a marketing powerhouse in which radio is only one part of the offering.

Second, they need to see the steps that should be taken today. Just what steps depends on where the station is at the moment.  If they're not selling marketing services--especially digital services--they should get started. If they're not thinking about buying a local newspaper or starting a direct mail initiative in their market, they should.  If they haven't set up a quasi-TV studio, they should.

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You get the picture. These are all steps toward the vision of being the go-to marketing company in their markets.  If they're successful at that, they'll capture business from every flat-footed newspaper, TV, Yellow Pages, direct mail, and radio rep in their markets. – Consultancy firm CEO Gordon Borrell (Borrell & Associates), Radio's Big Challenge: Finding Its Way Forward In This New Digital World, as quoted in a recent Forbes feature.

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Iron Butterfly's Doug Ingle performs at the Fillmore East on February 1, 1969 in New York City.
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Iron Butterfly's Doug Ingle performs at the Fillmore East on February 1, 1969 in New York City.

Music

Obituaries: Iron Butterfly's Doug Ingle, Disney Film Songwriter Richard M. Sherman

This week we also acknowledge the passing of Train bassist Charlie Colin and Jon Wysocki, founding member and drummer of Staind.

Doug Ingle, singer/keyboardist who co-founded the heavy rock band Iron Butterfly, died on May 24, at age 78. A cause has not been reported.

"Ingle, writer of Iron Butterfly’s signature song In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, was the last surviving member of the group’s classic lineup, which was formed in San Diego in 1966. Drummer Ron Bushy died in 2021 at age 79, bassist Lee Dornan passed in 2012 at age 70, and guitarist Erik Brann died in 2003 at age 52," Billboard's obituary notes.

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