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FYI

Alicia Keys' Alicia Debuts At No. 2, Right Behind Pop Smoke

Pop Smoke’s Shoot For The Stars Aim For The Moon remains at No.

Alicia Keys' Alicia Debuts At No. 2, Right Behind Pop Smoke

By FYI Staff

Pop Smoke’s Shoot For The Stars Aim For The Moon remains at No. 1 on the Billboard Canadian Albums chart for the eighth non-consecutive week, earning 9,500 total consumption units and, again, achieving the highest on-demand stream total for the week. The album jumps to No. 2 on the year-to-date album consumption chart, behind The Weeknd’s After Hours.


Alicia Keys’ ALICIA is the top new entry of the week, debuting at No. 2, and earning the highest album sales total for the week. It is her first release since 2016’s Here peaked at No. 10 and it is her highest-charting album since 2007’s As I Am debuted at No. 2.

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Juice WRLD’s Legends Never Die and Taylor Swift’s folklore both drop one position, to Nos. 3 and 4 respectively.

Keith Urban’s The Speed Of Now, Part 1 debuts at 5. It is the hat star’s sixth top five album and fourth straight, including his last album, 2018’s Graffiti U, which reached No. 1.

The third album to debut in the top ten this week belongs to Lil Tecca’s Virgo World, at No. 6. His last release, 2019’s We Love You Tecca, peaked at No. 3.

Two other new releases debut in the top 50, with American ‘Psycho’ singer Ava Max’s Heaven & Hell landing at 16 and Belgian-Congolese rapper Damso’s Qalf at No. 36.

– All data courtesy of SoundScan with additional detail provided by MRC’s Paul Tuch.

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The cast of "Stereophonic"
Julieta Cervantes

The cast of "Stereophonic"

Pop

Will Butler on Writing the Tony-Nominated Music for ‘Stereophonic’: ‘It Was Like a Thousand-Piece Puzzle With 200 Pieces Missing’

The former Arcade Fire member has two nominations for his stunning songs, written for a fictional (but very believable) rock band onstage.

Will Butler’s first meeting with playwright David Adjmi was fairly open-ended: a friend had told Butler that Adjmi — a fan of Arcade Fire, the band Butler was in at the time — was working on a play about a band and that Butler could “write the music or just consult or whatever.”

But from their first sit-down at a diner near New York’s theatre district, Adjmi’s vision was “instantly recognizable” to Butler: “Like, oh, it’s a demo — it’s like a transcendental thing that they can never recapture. You have things falling apart because the headphones sound bad, you have people yelling at each other over music but it’s because of how their dad treated them,” he recalls with a laugh.

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