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Rock

Tokyo Police Club Announce Breakup and Farewell Show in Toronto

The popular Ontario indie rockers are calling it a day, but not before a few more live dates.

Tokyo Police Club

Tokyo Police Club

Calm Elliott-Armstrong

Tokyo Police Club, one of the most successful Canadian indie rock bands of the last two decades, is calling it quits — but not before one more hometown goodbye show in Toronto on November 29 at History. Additional live dates are also in the works.

Though they began in Ontario, a press release announcing the band's breakup says the members of the band are now spread out from Los Angeles to Toronto to Prince Edward Island.


In a joint statement signed by "Dave, Graham, Josh and Greg," the group explains that, "It's time for us to say goodbye! This band has meant so much to us for so many years, but all magical things must come to an end. Tokyo Police Club will always stand for the connection we have shared ever since we were teenagers, and it's brought so many amazing people and moments into our lives."

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Tokyo Police Club was formed by four high school friends in Newmarket, Ontario, and comprises vocalist and bassist Dave Monks, keyboardist Graham Wright, guitarist Josh Hook, and drummer Greg Alsop. The group made a splash with an acclaimed debut EP, A Lesson In Crime, in 2006, going on to release two more EPs and five full-length albums and tour internationally, from Coachella to The Late Show with David Letterman.

Among other nominations, the band was twice up for the Juno Award for Alternative Album of the Year, in 2011 for Champ and in 2019 for TPC, its final full-length release.

Tickets for the HISTORY show are available pre-sale on Jan. 24 at TokyoPoliceClub.com [pw: TPC4EVER], on Thursday. Jan. 25 via Ticketmaster [pw: SPOTLIGHT] and to the general public this Friday, Jan. 26 via HISTORY.

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