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FYI

Blinker The Star: I Won't Look Down

Rock auteur and studio wunderkind Jordon Zadorozny returns to his long-term project with this advance track from an album due next spring. Keyboards and guitars mesh effectively, there are enough tempo changes to keep things interesting, and the production values are top-notch.

Blinker The Star: I Won't Look Down

By Kerry Doole

Blinker The Star: "I Won't Look Down" (Nile River Records). Blinker The Star is the long-time project of singer/songwriter/producer Jordon Zadorozny, a rock auteur and studio wunderkind who can be viewed as the Canadian equivalent of Todd Rundgren or Jeff Lynne.


He specialises in layered productions that retain a strong melodic core, and this new track, released today, is no exception. Keyboards and guitars mesh effectively, there are enough tempo changes to keep things interesting, and the production values are top-notch.

It was recorded at Zadorozny's Skylark Park Studio in Pembroke, Ontario, and co-written with Bob Wilcox, who also made contributions to Blinker The Star's 2017 album 8 Of Hearts.

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Zadorozny informs us that "work continues on a new album slated for next spring with shows being planned for the first time in six years." That is excellent news, for he remains one of our most talented (if rather undervalued) artists.

In the late '90s, he gained attention for co-writing songs with Courtney Love in the late 1990s, and he has also appeared on recordings by Melissa Auf der Maur, Sam Roberts, Mandy Moore, and others.

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The cast of "Stereophonic"
Julieta Cervantes

The cast of "Stereophonic"

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Will Butler on Writing the Tony-Nominated Music for ‘Stereophonic’: ‘It Was Like a Thousand-Piece Puzzle With 200 Pieces Missing’

The former Arcade Fire member has two nominations for his stunning songs, written for a fictional (but very believable) rock band onstage.

Will Butler’s first meeting with playwright David Adjmi was fairly open-ended: a friend had told Butler that Adjmi — a fan of Arcade Fire, the band Butler was in at the time — was working on a play about a band and that Butler could “write the music or just consult or whatever.”

But from their first sit-down at a diner near New York’s theatre district, Adjmi’s vision was “instantly recognizable” to Butler: “Like, oh, it’s a demo — it’s like a transcendental thing that they can never recapture. You have things falling apart because the headphones sound bad, you have people yelling at each other over music but it’s because of how their dad treated them,” he recalls with a laugh.

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