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DJ Khaled’s Father Of Asahd Is This Week's No. 1 Album

It’s a big week for new releases, with five debuting in the top ten–including two at the top of the chart.

DJ Khaled’s Father Of Asahd Is This Week's No. 1 Album

By FYI Staff

It’s a big week for new releases, with five debuting in the top ten–including two at the top of the chart.


DJ Khaled’s Father Of Asahd debuts at No. 1 on the Billboard Canadian Albums chart with 8,800 total consumption units, despite not topping any of the metrics used to compile the list.  The celebrity producer and rapper achieves the second highest audio-on-demand streams, and digital song download and the sixth highest album sales totals for the week. It is his first chart-topping album in Canada, surpassing the No. 2 peak of his last release, 2017’s Grateful.

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Tyler, The Creator’s IGOR debuts at 2, scoring the highest audio-on-demand stream total for the week. It matches his previous highest charted album with 2013’s Wolf and 2017’s Flower Boy.

The number one album from the last two weeks, Billie Eilish’s When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? drops to 3.

The National’s I Am Easy to Find debuts at 4. It is the group’s fourth top five album and first since Sleep Well Beast debuted at No. 1 in September 2017.

Rammstein’s self-titled album debuts at 5, picking up the highest album sales total for the week. It is their first top ten album, surpassing the No. 14 peak of their 2001 release Mutter.

Lewis Capaldi’s first full-length album, Divinely Uninspired to A Hellish Extent, debuts at 10.

Other debuts in the top 50 include Carly Rae Jepsen’s Dedicated, at 16, and Head and The Heart’s Living Mirage at 28.

Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road” holds at No. 1 on the Streaming Songs chart and returns to No. 1 on the Digital Songs chart.

-- All data courtesy of SoundScan with additional comments provided by Nielsen Canada Director, Paul Tuch.

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